This April the National Door Industries, Inc. officially launched a partnership with Boot Campaign at the International Door Association Expo in Las Vegas, donating $10,000 to the cause. The partnership will help raise awareness about challenges veterans may face post-service and helps fund Boot Campaign’s health and wellness program.

“The whole National Door organization is supportive of the military,” explains James Webb, Vice-President Sales and Marketing at National Door Industries, a wholesale manufacturer and distributor to the garage door industry that is based in Haltom City, Texas. “So, when I brought this partnership forward, everyone agreed that we had to do it.”

“I originally talked to the owners of the company about a donation to Boot Campaign,” explains Webb. “But it quickly became apparent that our corporate goals were perfectly lined up with the organization. So, we made a $10,000 donation at this year’s IDA Expo, but our dedication to the Boot Campaign runs much deeper.”

Webb has a personal tie to Boot Campaign as well. His son-in-law Morgan Luttrell is twin brother to Marcus Luttrell, the Lone Survivor author and former Navy SEAL who inspired Boot Campaign founders to start the organization. Morgan, also a former Navy SEAL, was a driving force behind Boot Campaign health and wellness program when it launched in 2016.

“The goal [of the health and wellness program] is to improve the quality of life for veterans. We are providing access to first-rate, innovative care that treats the whole person,” says Boot Campaign CEO Shelly Kirkland.

“By linking arms with wellness partners across the country, Boot Campaign is able to help clients address issues such as traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain, self-medication and insomnia. This can kick-start a veteran’s journey to take back control of their health and wellness and is also furthering scientific research that will improve the lives others in the future.”

Over the next three years, Boot Campaign will be steadily increasing support for military family members as part of the health and wellness programs. According to a recent report from the National Alliance for Caregiving, sixty-five percent of veteran caregivers report caregiver burden. Currently, most programs offering services to military caregivers tend to be targeted toward the veteran. Results of recent studies suggest that treating a veteran individually for PTSD without including the spouse in the treatment sessions could risk unbalancing their relationship even more than it already is. Boot Campaign aims to fill this gap, not only ensuring the veteran as an individual is supported, but the couple and family unit as well.